ashleighthelion:


"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

I really resonated with this moment so much. So many people (especially other Black people) mocked this scene and Viola Davis’ worth, beauty, autonomy, experiences, and the representation her character embodies for Black women. And that ignorance reemphasized Viola Davis and many black women’s reality and actual struggle with feeling other-ed, being seen as one dimensional, and being seen as the bottom of the hierarchy of beauty standards. I hate that Viola was so empowered by getting this role and then hateful ignorant people exploited this moment on the show to belittle her with anti-Black jokes and referencing trope movie roles she specifically wanted to move away from (referencing: The Help, The Color Purple). Viola is a goddess and this moment on How to Get Away with Murder was revolutionary.
ashleighthelion:


"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

I really resonated with this moment so much. So many people (especially other Black people) mocked this scene and Viola Davis’ worth, beauty, autonomy, experiences, and the representation her character embodies for Black women. And that ignorance reemphasized Viola Davis and many black women’s reality and actual struggle with feeling other-ed, being seen as one dimensional, and being seen as the bottom of the hierarchy of beauty standards. I hate that Viola was so empowered by getting this role and then hateful ignorant people exploited this moment on the show to belittle her with anti-Black jokes and referencing trope movie roles she specifically wanted to move away from (referencing: The Help, The Color Purple). Viola is a goddess and this moment on How to Get Away with Murder was revolutionary.
ashleighthelion:


"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

I really resonated with this moment so much. So many people (especially other Black people) mocked this scene and Viola Davis’ worth, beauty, autonomy, experiences, and the representation her character embodies for Black women. And that ignorance reemphasized Viola Davis and many black women’s reality and actual struggle with feeling other-ed, being seen as one dimensional, and being seen as the bottom of the hierarchy of beauty standards. I hate that Viola was so empowered by getting this role and then hateful ignorant people exploited this moment on the show to belittle her with anti-Black jokes and referencing trope movie roles she specifically wanted to move away from (referencing: The Help, The Color Purple). Viola is a goddess and this moment on How to Get Away with Murder was revolutionary.
ashleighthelion:


"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

I really resonated with this moment so much. So many people (especially other Black people) mocked this scene and Viola Davis’ worth, beauty, autonomy, experiences, and the representation her character embodies for Black women. And that ignorance reemphasized Viola Davis and many black women’s reality and actual struggle with feeling other-ed, being seen as one dimensional, and being seen as the bottom of the hierarchy of beauty standards. I hate that Viola was so empowered by getting this role and then hateful ignorant people exploited this moment on the show to belittle her with anti-Black jokes and referencing trope movie roles she specifically wanted to move away from (referencing: The Help, The Color Purple). Viola is a goddess and this moment on How to Get Away with Murder was revolutionary.

ashleighthelion:

"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

I really resonated with this moment so much. So many people (especially other Black people) mocked this scene and Viola Davis’ worth, beauty, autonomy, experiences, and the representation her character embodies for Black women. And that ignorance reemphasized Viola Davis and many black women’s reality and actual struggle with feeling other-ed, being seen as one dimensional, and being seen as the bottom of the hierarchy of beauty standards. I hate that Viola was so empowered by getting this role and then hateful ignorant people exploited this moment on the show to belittle her with anti-Black jokes and referencing trope movie roles she specifically wanted to move away from (referencing: The Help, The Color Purple). Viola is a goddess and this moment on How to Get Away with Murder was revolutionary.

(via covenesque)

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th
iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.
Early morning, Monday, October 13th

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.

Early morning, Monday, October 13th

(via tvwhitley)

globalvoices:

Hudhud devastates. No power. No news. Uprooted trees in the streets. Praying for safety #Vizag

What’s Been Worse for India: Cyclone Hudhud or the Media Frenzy About It?

songnumberthree:

k1mkardashian:

she went awf

#you do not understand white mom culture until you’ve watched this video

(via gatitaborrachita)

thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.
thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.

thoughtsofablackgirl:

The Flawless And Stunning Viola Davis.

(via covenesque)

“Every time we call a girl “fast”, we perpetuate rape culture. Every time we call a girl a “THOT”, “hoe”, “slut”, or “whore,” we perpetuate rape culture. Every time we consume media where the hyper-sexualization and objectification of (Black) women’s bodies is evident (and the women themselves may not have agency over their own representation), we perpetuate rape culture. Every time we tell our girls how to “protect themselves” instead of telling our boys how to be respectful and to recognize the bodily autonomy of women, we perpetuate rape culture. Growing up, my mother gave me the “don’t get raped” run-down that many girls get: don’t wear suggestive clothing; don’t drink anything you haven’t made yourself; don’t stay out too late; don’t go out by yourself; have your keys in your hand walking to your car late at night… Not once do I ever remember my brother getting the “don’t rape a woman” speech.”
— Michelle Denise Jackson is a writer, performer, storyteller, and teaching artist living in Southern California. She is a graduate of NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. She has performed in New Jersey, New York, Michigan, Washington D.C., and Southern California. For more of her wit and work, visit her website (michelledenisejackson.com) or follow her on Twitter (@MichelleJigga). (via unapproachableblackchicks)

(via unapproachableblackchicks)

nyuservice:

¡DUENDE! Long Beach was founded in August 2011 by a group of woman artists, poets, performers, and musicians. We are a grassroots community arts organization providing creative programming, mentoring, and performance opportunities for youth in the Long Beach area. Although our approaches to creating are as diverse as our backgrounds, it is the spirit and passion behind our art that unites. Simply, we want to empower and enable the youth in our beloved community with the creative tools they need to become unstoppable leaders and agents for change.

 

In July 2012, we hope to send a group of talented, committed youth to the Brave New Voices International Youth Poetry Festival in the San Francisco Bay Area, the largest ongoing spoken word event in the world. BNV brings together young artists, activists, educators, poets, and emerging leaders to participate in a celebration and demonstration of free speech, artistic empowerment, and youth voice.

Every year, hundreds of youth compete on slam teams from the U.S. and Europe at BNV. At the center of the festival is the International Youth Poetry Slam. A poetry slam is a high-energy competition where spoken word poets share meaningful original works that are then “judged” by members of the audience. 

However, Brave New Voices also offers numerous community forums, workshops, conferences, and performance events that encourage youth, artists, educators, activists, and community leaders to be advocates and agents for positive change on a local and global scale.

I never saw this, but thank you nyuservice for this write-up of my (now defunct) community organization, ¡DUENDE! Long Beach. This was a gift to find this morning.

Throwback Pics of Jesse Williams

Throwback Pics of Jesse Williams

Throwback Pics of Jesse Williams

Throwback Pics of Jesse Williams

Throwback Pics of Jesse Williams

Throwback Pics of Jesse Williams

Throwback Pics of Jesse Williams

(via dahyanasmiles)